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Getting a job as an autistic person

This is going to be the first post of a series on employability for autistic people.

A report by the Office for National statistics gives a shocking statistic that just 21.7% of autistic people are employed. This shows that the majority of people with autism are unemployed. Autistic people have so many strengths that they can give to society, so why do we have so many issues with gaining employment?

  1. Lack of access to opportunities

One of the biggest factors in getting a job is being able to prove that you are well qualified for it. This is often achieved through past experiences. There is a definite lack of schemes that allow autistic people to gain skills that are required for work. The schemes that there are in colleges are often for the most well performing students only. Additionally, the education system pushes a lot of people into pursuing a uni degree when actually, there are a lot of other options! Especially in things that you may have a special interest and excel in!

I think autistic people can really benefit significantly from work experience and internships. These experiences provide opportunities for autistic people to develop their abilities as well as gain pints to add to their CV. However these are often highly competitive and require a lot of effort to secure.

Volunteering is a great way to get round this. It opens up so many opportunities for employment. Charities always looking for new people it looks great on a CV as well as being a good transition into work. Volunteering at St Catherines hospice was a great way for me to prove that I had the communication skills and dedication required for my degree and it really helped me develop my people skills. When thinking about starting volunteering:

  • – Think about what interests or excites you.
  • – Think about what time or skills you can give.
  • – Research
    you can:
  • 2. The recruitment process

Often, job advertisements are wordy and full of jargon that serves to deter autistic people. Questionnaires that ask you to rate how much you relate to certain characteristics are often misleading and hard to fill out. Often job skills are listed that aren’t absolutely necessary for the job meaning they are misleading.

For example, I worked in a warehouse for just under a year – A job that would be great for most autistic people however in the job description, it listed teamwork and communication s as a must. I very much think that you could get by without being particularly strong in those areas – There are much more important skills that should be focused on. Someone could be the best team worker in the world and not last a day in that place because of the fact the work is so repetitive. So don’t get put off by job descriptions!

Sections on application forms that allow you to disclose a disability are useful because employers are obliged to provide reasonable adjustments to overcome potential barriers or disadvantages. In my opinion, it is better for employers to know because sometimes, if you are attempting to mask your autism, you could come across as shifty or being ‘not quite right’ which may put employers off as they can’t quite put their finger on it. If they know that it is due to autism then it won’t effect the interview. (Plus it is good for them if they can prove that they employ a diverse range of people)

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

3. The interview

The interview is usually the hardest part of the process for both neurotypicals and autistic people alike.

Interviews are heavily orientated around social skills and first impressions which makes things harder for autistic people. Making eye contact, understanding verbal and non-verbal cues, knowing when to stop when answering questions, thinking in abstract ways and coping with the different environment.

The environment is a massive factor when it comes to interviews. They can be highly overstimulating in an already stressful situation and lead to an autistic person underperforming. Things like the noise of a busy work place taking your focus away from meeting the interviewer for the first time, bright fluorescent lights giving you a migraine, the smell of the receptionists perfume in the waiting room making you feel ill… These are all things that can render you unable to perform at your best.

One thing that I am really grateful of lockdown for is the fact that all of the interviews for things I applied for were over phone meaning I could focus on the questions at hand rather than an overstimulating environment. I had a lot less to focus on because I couldn’t see the interviewer so my answers were better.

Now, post COVID some interviews may be in person again. I think a good way to prepare for interviews is by watching a variety of videos online of people being interviewed and practicing their mannerisms. If I was to have an in person interview, I would make sure to prepare by making a checklist of worries to tick off before the day eg:

  • Do I know how to get there and how long I will take to get there?
  • Do I know how long the interview will take? Is it split into sections?
  • Do I know what time the transport home will be?
  • What am I going to do after the interview?
  • What is the dress code?
  • What will happen once I arrive? Is there a reception desk?
  • What questions might they ask?
  • Who will be interviewing and how many interviewers are there?
  • How can I answer general questions such as ‘tell me about yourself?’?

Some of these may not sound important but things like knowing what I will be doing after the interview are really helpful for me as I really like to know what I’m doing and when so if I don’t have a plan for the rest of the day, I will be thinking about it during the interview. Some of these questions are things you could ask the employer in a nice email.

A reasonable adjustment some people may have is having someone in the interview with them, to rephrase difficult questions. Some employers may also offer work trial periods. A good thing to look up may be the the Kickstart Scheme which is open to people that are aged 16-24 that are currently claiming Universal Credit and are at risk of long-term unemployment. They provide support in gaining employment. 

A good place to find good general interview advice is at prospects.co.uk

Top 5 tips

  1. Think about what you are passionate about and research jobs in that field – enthusiasm counts for a lot in an interview!
  2. Consider getting some volunteering experience.
  3. Try to think about how you can relate things you’ve done in the past to skills that are required for the job you’re applying to.
  4. Get some interview practice.
  5. Be communicative with potential employers about any reasonable adjustments you may need.